I’m going to miss the melon from Greece when I return.

Well, I guess I’ll just begin. Bear with me.

The last two days were good days in the library, feeling like we are starting to master the scary back room full of books and getting them into somewhat organized piles. Then both days around 6 o’clock we hit the beach in nearby Rafina. Definitely a good way to close the day 🙂

Today was a little different because instead of going to the library we went to Helping Hands to hang out with kids, serve tea, and overall be with refugees from all over the world. There were lots of languages being spoken, and one of my favorite things was greeting children in Farsi, English, and Greek when they came to the baby room. If they didn’t respond, I assumed they spoke French, Arabic, or something else entirely. (Or perhaps I just wasn’t speaking clearly!) We had a bit of a rough time finding the center, and a very long commute back “home”, but I know that I learned a lot from the experience.

It’s interesting to note that the longer I am here in Greece the more I learn, the more I feel like I could/should write and record, but it gets much harder to find words to express what I’m thinking/feeling.

I could use prayer for energy for each day, for continued health, and for preparation to leave, as awful as that sounds. I don’t know if there is a “right” way to withdraw from a place, or if I should just push to the end like nothing different is happening, but I have trouble thinking about leaving in a few weeks.

Also be in prayer for a brother of one of the women at the center who is still trying to make it to Greece to join her. He is only 14 or 15 and has nothing, stuck not home or here in Greece, but in a middle country. I can’t imagine…

Lastly, pray for the bible college (www.grbc.gr) as they are always facing new difficulties with zoning laws, money, the government….

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One Response to I’m going to miss the melon from Greece when I return.

  1. I work with refugees too, and their stories are heartbreaking when they are waiting to be reunited with family! Thinking of you, Kier! It sounds like you’re having an amazing time. The best things are hard.

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